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Folsom International Triathlon Training Plan

It was brought to my attention that the format of the previous training plan for Auburn was difficult to print.  As such, this training plan is done in plain text so you can copy and paste in Word.

Like previous plans, this one has two tracks.  The first track is for those wishing to “just finish” the international-distance race, titled Base Training below.  The second training track is for those looking to improve performance and includes specific interval work, titled Performance Training below (beneath the Base plan at the bottom of this page).  The speed focus for the next ten weeks will be on anaerobic development (a.k.a. VO2 max, a.k.a. “go hard until you taste bile then slow down just a touch”) as this is an unexplored area for this club.  No more Zone 4, no more sub-threshold.  Just all out speed.  More details below.

Note that the Tri For Real relay is smack in the middle of this schedule and I made not adjustment for it.  Since you will each be doing a different disciple (i.e. swim or bike or run, but not swim and bike and run) the adjustments will vary from individual to individual.  Please reach out to me for individual modifications to this plan.

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BASE TRAINING PLAN

Week 10 beginning May 18
Recovery week.  Stay active.  Just keep duration very short and intensity very low.  Prioritize swimming and biking over running.
Monday  = Happy Hour @ Three Forks
Tuesday  = “Active Recovery” = 20 minutes walking or easy swimming or easy biking
Wednesday = Day Off
Thursday = 20 minutes easy swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 45 minute easy bike (note, no club practice today)
Sunday = Athlete’s choice = 20 to 30 minutes cardio of choice

Week 9 beginning May 25
Assuming you feel recovered from Auburn, normal training resumes this week.  The focus for the Base plan will be aerobic work, meaning Zone 2-type efforts where workouts feel like work yet are still at a conversational effort.  
Monday  = 3 mile run
Tuesday = 10 mile bike
Wednesday = 2 mile run
Thursday = 800 yard swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 15 mile bike + 1 mile run otb (off the bike)
Sunday = 800 yard swim

Week 8 beginning June 1
Repeat from last week.  Try to use some of the same courses and see if you can decrease your times over the same distances
Monday  = 3 mile run
Tuesday = 10 mile bike
Wednesday = 2 mile run
Thursday = 800 yard swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 15 mile bike + 1 mile run otb (off the bike)
Sunday = 1000 yard swim

Week 7 beginning June 8
Introduction of speed work this week.  All intervals listed should be completed at a fast yet sustainable pace so that the last interval is just as fast as the first.  (all times or distances listed parenthetically are recovery intervals done between the fast intervals)   Note that 200m is half way around a high school track and equal to 1/8th of a mile. 
Monday  = 4 mile run, including 6 x 200m (100 walk)
Tuesday = 10 mile bike + 1/2 mile run otb
Wednesday = 2 mile run
Thursday = 800 yard swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 15 mile bike + 1 mile run otb (off the bike)
Sunday = 1000 yard swim

Week 6 beginning June 15
Use the longer Saturday bricks to practice the same nutrition and hydration used on race day.
Monday  = 4 mile run, including 6 x 200m (100 walk)
Tuesday = 10 mile bike + 1/2 mile run otb
Wednesday = 2 mile run
Thursday = 800 yard swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 20 mile bike + 1 mile run otb (off the bike)
Sunday = 1000 yard swim

Week 5 beginning June 22
Tri For Real Relay week – reach out to Coach Bees for advice on how to rearrange your week depending on which specific discipline you are completing.  
Monday  = 4 mile run, including 6 x 200m (100 walk)
Tuesday = 10 mile bike
Wednesday = 2 mile run
Thursday = 800 yard swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 1000 yd swim or 15 mile bike or 3 mile run
Sunday = TRI FOR REAL RELAY

Week 4 beginning June 29
Those who bike or ran the relay should cut Tuesday’s workout down to a little 30 minute recovery ride.
Monday  = Happy Hour at Three Forks

Tuesday = 10 mile bike + 1/2 mile run otb
Wednesday = 4 mi run, including 4 x 400 (200 jog/walk)
Thursday = 800 yard swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 20 mile bike + 2 mile run otb
Sunday = 1300 yd swim

Week 3 beginning July 6
Monday  = 6 mile run
Tuesday = 10 mile bike
Wednesday = 2 mi run
Thursday = 800 yard swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 25 mile bike + 1 mile run otb
Sunday = 1300 yd swim

Week 2 beginning July 13
Thursday’s bike is not meant to be a hard workout.  Use the Swim+Bike sessions this week to practice your T1.
Monday  = 6 mile run
Tuesday = 10 mile bike
Wednesday = 2 mi run
Thursday = 1500 yard swim + 2 mile bike
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 500 swim + 25 mile bike + 3 mile run otb
Sunday = Day Off

Week 1 beginning July 20
Last chance to dial in transitions.
Monday =  Active Recovery
Tuesday =  15 mile bike + 1/2 run otb
Wednesday =  4 mile run
Thursday = 1500 yard swim + 2 mile bike
Friday =  Day Off
Saturday = 500 swim + 10 mile bike + 2 mile run
Sunday =  Day Off

Race Week beginning July 27
Take the middle path this week – not too much, not too little.  If you have been rearranging the workout days up to this point, please follow this week’s plan exactly as written.  
Monday = 3 mile run
Tuesday = 10 mile bike
Wednesday =  1000 swim + 1 mile run
Thursday =  Day Off
Friday =  Day Off
Saturday =  Race Prep = 4 mile bike + 1/2 mile run
Sunday = RACE DAY

——————————————————————-

PERFORMANCE TRAINING PLAN

Week 10 beginning May 18
Recovery week.  Stay active.  Just keep duration very short and intensity very low.  Prioritize swimming and biking over running.
Monday  = Happy Hour @ Three Forks
Tuesday  = “Active Recovery” = 20 minutes walking or easy swimming or easy biking
Wednesday = Another 30 to 60 minutes of easy biking
Thursday = 20 minutes easy swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 10 mile bike + 1 mile run (note, no club practice today)
Sunday = Athlete’s choice = 20 to 30 minutes cardio of choice

Week 9 beginning May 25
Assuming you feel recovered from Auburn, normal training resumes this week.  Unless otherwise notes, all sessions are aerobic workouts done at a conversational Zone 2 pace.  For the intervals, go as fast as you can maintain for all sets, meaning that the last interval is as fast as the first yet you could not do more.  All rest intervals are listed parenthetically.  
Monday  = 5 mile run
Tuesday = 15 mile bike including:
–  8:00 as 8 x :30 sprint! (:30 easy)
– 5:00 easy
– 8:00 as 8 x :30 sprint! (:30 easy)  stay seated for all sprints today
Wednesday = 3 mile run
Thursday = 1500 yard open water swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 20 mile bike + 2 mile run otb (off the bike)
Sunday = 1500 yard swim including:
– 10 x 25 odds fast, evens easy (:10)
– 100 easy (:20)
– 4 x 200 at race effort (:20)

Week 8 beginning June 1
Work  through fatigued legs on Tuesday to hit the intervals hard.  These are ideally done on relatively flat ground.
Monday  = 5 mile run
Tuesday = 15 mile bike including:
–  15:00 as 5 x 1:00 sprint! (2:00 easy) remain seated for the sprints
– 5:00 easy
– 10:00 as 2 x 3:00 fast (2:00 easy)
Wednesday = 3 mile run, middle mile is all out timed effort.  email your time to Scott.
Thursday = 1500 yd open water swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 20 mile bike + 2 mile run otb
Sunday = 1500 yard swim including:
– 400 with last 100 fast (:40)
– 300 with last 75 fast (:30)
– 200 with last 50 fast (:20)
– 100 with last 25 fast

Week 7 beginning June 8
Monday  = 5 mile run, middle 3 are at perceived race pace
Tuesday = 15 mile bike including:
–  6 x 2:00 hill attacks
Wednesday = 3 mile run
Thursday = 1500 yd open water swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 20 mile bike + 2 mile run otb
Sunday = 1500 yard swim including:
– 10 x 50 odds fast, evens easy (:10)
– 100 easy (:10)
– 5 x 100 fast (:20)

Week 6 beginning June 15
Use the longer Saturday bricks to practice the same nutrition and hydration used on race day.  To test your hydration, weigh in before and after your long brick to see if you have lost weight.  
Monday  = 7 mile run including:
– 2 miles at race pace
– 1 mile easy
– 2 miles at race pace
Tuesday = 15 mile bike including:
–  15:00 as 15 x :30 sprint! (:30 easy) stay seated and pace yourself!
Wednesday = 4 mile run including:
– 6 x 400 (200 easy)
Thursday = 1500 yd open water swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 20 mile bike + 4 mile run otb
Sunday = 1500 yard swim including:
– 16 x 25 fast (:10)
– 100 easy (:30)
– 2 x 500 at race pace (:50)

Week 5 beginning June 22
Tri For Real Relay week – reach out to Coach Bees for advice on how to rearrange your week depending on which specific discipline you are completing.  
Monday  = 7 mile run including:
– 2 miles at race pace
– 1 mile easy
– 2 miles at race pace
Tuesday = 15 mile bike including:
–  30:00 as 10 x 1:00 sprint! (2:00 easy)
– 5:00 easy
– 5:00 as :15 sprint (:45 easy)
Wednesday = 4 mile run including:
– 8 x 200 (100 easy)
Thursday = 1500 yd open water swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 1500 swim or 20 mile bike or 3 mile run otb
Sunday = TRI FOR REAL RELAY

Week 4 beginning June 29
Those who bike or ran the relay should cut Tuesday’s workout down to a little 30 minute recovery ride and Wednesday’s run to a 30 minute easy jog. 
Monday  = Happy Hour at Three Forks

Tuesday = 10 mile bike + 1/2 mile run otb
Wednesday = 7 mile run
Thursday = 1500 yard swim
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 30 mile bike + 2 mile run otb, with bike completed as:
– 5 mile build, i.e. start easy and build your effort throughout the warm up
– 10 miles at race effort
– 5 miles easy
– 10 miles at race effort
Sunday = 1500 yd swim = easy effort

Week 3 beginning July 6
Monday  = 9 mile run
Tuesday = 10 mile bike, easy recovery ride
Wednesday = Day Off
Thursday = 1500 yard swim + 2 mile run
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 30 mile bike + 3 mile run otb with bike completed as:
– 5 mile build, i.e. start easy and build your effort throughout the warm up
– 10 miles at race effort
– 5 miles easy
– 10 miles at race effort
– first mile of the run otb at race effort
Sunday = 1500 yd swim done as 2 x 750 at race effort

Week 2 beginning July 13
Thursday’s bike is not meant to be a hard workout.  Use the Swim+Bike sessions this week to practice your T1.
Monday  = 7 mile run
Tuesday = 10 mile bike
Wednesday = 5 mi run including:
3 x 1 mile hard effort (1/4 mile easy)
Thursday = 1500 yard swim at race effort + 2 mile bike
Friday = Day Off
Saturday = 500 swim + 25 mile bike + 3 mile run otb
Sunday = Day Off

Week 1 beginning July 20
Last chance to dial in transitions.
Monday =  Active Recovery
Tuesday =  5 mile bike + 1/2 run otb
Wednesday =  Day Off
Thursday = 1500 yard swim + 2 mile bike
Friday =  Day Off
Saturday = 500 swim + 15 mile bike + 2 mile run, all completed at race effort
Sunday =  Day Off

Race Week beginning July 27
Take the middle path this week – not too much, not too little.  If you have been rearranging the workout days up to this point, please follow this week’s plan exactly as written.  
Monday = 3 mile run
Tuesday = 10 mile bike
Wednesday =  1000 swim + 1 mile run
Thursday =  Day Off
Friday =  Day Off
Saturday =  Race Prep = 4 mile bike + 1/2 mile run
Sunday = RACE DAY

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Our Favorite Pre-season Bricks

Erin Stone Time TrailDuring the winter and early spring months, any training is good training. Whether treadmill, rower or cross-country skiing, any activity that maintains (or improves!) your cardiovascular base while keeping you mentally engaged is a good thing in our opinion. However, as spring turns to summer there is a need to progress from general training to sport-specific training. As triathlete this means we need to swim, bike, and run. In that order.

Every triathlete has experienced the “dead wood” feeling in your legs on the first half mile of a run after a hard bike. By logging some key early season bricks, you can quickly adapt your body’s ability to the run off the bike (otb).

There are two effects at work in your body in the run otb. The first and most obvious is the muscular effect. Working muscles need to have the endurance to sustain back to back bike and run sessions. The second effect is less obvious to novice triathletes and less studied by the science side of our sport. This is the neurological effect of the brick. The wiring between brain and legs literally needs to be programmed to switch the activity from bike movement patterns to run movement patterns.

 

Here are our favorite bricks to help your body adapt during early season.

 

Brick #1: The Baby Brick

– normal bike ride, whatever that means for you

– 5:00 to 10:00 run off the bike

This might seem painfully obvious. And not that challenging. The key is to do this for every single bike ride for a couple weeks in early season until your legs are used to the run otb. This is one of Coach John’s favorites.

 

Brick #2: The Du Yo Yo

– 10:00 Bike

– 5:00 Run

– 10:00 Bike

– 5:00 Run

– 10:00 Bike

– 5:00 Run

– 10:00 Bike

– 5:00 Run

The above assumes a relatively new triathlete training for an Oly or shorter. If you have been tuning up for a half or full ironman, then you could change the intervals to 30:00 bike + 15:00 run. For this one I often ride the trainer in the garage with a short run around the block as the big key for this session is quick transitions which can be hampered when taking the time to lock the bike to your car or at a trailhead.

 

Brick #3: The T1 Ride

– race distance swim

– half race distance bike

(we again assume Oly distance or sprint)  This is without question the most under-utilized brick in triathlon. When you make the transition from swim to bike there are a couple interesting obstacles. Much of your blood has been pulled into your trunk to keep organs warm in cold water and also to your chest and shoulders since they are doing the work. Transitions from swim to the bike force your legs to deal with those blood flow issues. You will also have to contend with heat-retention problems while riding in wet gear.   Don’t hesitate to complete this from your gym pool if it is too cold to get in open water.

 

All three of the above should be completed after a warm up and include some easy walking or riding as a cool down. To be clear, these are our early season bricks and should not be confused with our suggestions for peak season training bricks that focus on race-specific pacing. They are simply designed to adapt muscles and neurology to the demands of our sport.

 

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Thoughts on Pre-Season Training

It’s nice out (for the most part) and you’re probably getting the urgency to put in some serious work. I love the motivation, but here are some points that hopefully convince you to proceed with caution.

 

It is not “un-heard of” for endurance athletes to set personal records well into their 60’s. Not because they decided to get there act together after retirement, but rather they have put in a huge, injury-free, base for many years. What they’re seeing is a compounding effect of all the miles they’ve ever put into their body.

 

No one workout will make your season, but one workout can definitely break it. I encourage you to err on the side of caution during intervals and tempo or threshold work. The most likely spot of injury I see is during running. First off, don’t go too fast. Intervals should be somewhere close to 95% of V02 max. Tempos should feel “comfortably hard” and very sustainable. If your workouts feel too difficult, you are not only risking injury, but possibly training out of your most effective zone. I find that with endurance athletes, I am commonly “pulling the reins” rather than “cracking the whip,” so don’t get the feeling that you’re slacking off. Even midway through the season, when you’re getting faster, do not be tempted to set records during speed days. Wait until race day. Even then, consider if any race is worth injuring yourself for. Even your “A” race may not be worth the injury, especially if it knocks you out for the next season… Secondly, I encourage walk breaks during run workouts. I have a rule, “whatever walking you do during running, counts towards your total run time.” Remember the term “no pain no gain” we all grew up learning in gym class? It is very wrong.

 

Don’t forget the recovery techniques: Sleeping properly/ regularly, eating healthy, walk breaks, recovery workouts, keeping intensity low when needed, foam rolling/self massage, professional massage, and other stress relieving practices such as yoga. Ultimately find what works for you, and do it routinely. Potential injuries always show up from training. Listen to your body and deal with them. Don’t allow them to turn into full blown injuries. Working out is like putting pennies in the jar. These extra recovery techniques are like putting a second penny in the jar.

 

A Personal Story: I will never forget one runner from college. He never stepped out of his proper zones, always scheduled time for recovery, and made about a paragraph of notes from each workout. Despite being the number one runner on the team, he would often fall out of the team training runs. It surprised me that the rest of the team never paid attention to his discipline, and instead were always “competing” with each other in training, and often getting very injured at a young age. He was the school record holder for the 5k and 10k. I try to think about him, when someone fly’s past me in a training session.

 

Make this a good couple months of pre-season training rather than a few record setting workouts. Many of you are starting to see the compounding effects of a couple years of training – both performance and weight loss. Let’s build another great year into your base.

 

Stay consistent!

 

Article contributed by Coach John Taipale. 

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10 Mistakes of Rookie Runners

You’ve survived the January “resolution rush” at the gym. You’ve continued running through the February freeze. Maybe this running thing really is for you. Here are some pitfalls to be aware of as your running progresses from recreational to habitual.

 

10 Mistakes of Rookie Runners

 

1) Running the same pace on all runs

There is no quicker way to becoming a slow runner than running at your “go all day pace.” Do a short, fast run each week. Sprinkle in some intervals. Make your longer run a run/walk mix where the run is a little faster than normal. Anything.   Just shake it up a bit.

2) Running the same pace during the entire run run

As it turns out, that whole sprint to the finish thing we did as kids isn’t a really good idea. Why? You need to warm up and cool down. The warm up allows your heart rate to increase gradually and your veins to dilate allowing more blood to get to working muscles. And, your joints become better lubricated. When you stop quickly, these processes don’t have a chance to properly reverse and certain metabolites (read: tiny things that make your sore later) don’t clear from your muscles.

3) Only running roads

Running is a very linear sport and the repetitive nature of it can lead to imbalances that can lead to injury. By running on uneven trail surfaces you work little stabilizing muscles.   And when the trail is hilly you work an entirely different set of muscles, further minimizing the risk of developing imbalances.

4) Using the elliptical machine

Want to be a better runner without running? Walk steep hills. If it is too cold to run outside and you are trapped at the gym simply crank the dreadmill up to 6 or 8 or 10% and go for a brisk walk. It will work your glutes and VMO (the inside of your quads) more and better approximates the run stride than the elliptical.

5) Underestimating hydration needs

You don’t need fancy sport drinks. But even a 45 minute jog in the cold dry winter air could necessitate an extra pint or two of water throughout the rest of your day. If you’re going for your first marathon with epically long runs you should weigh yourself before and after to see exactly what your weight change is from sweat loss.

6) Overestimating nutrition needs

Repeat: You don’t need fancy sport drinks. In fact, unless you are diabetic/hypoglycemic or running more than 90 minutes you don’t need to fuel during the run.

7) Wearing your new shoes everywhere

Run shoes are for running. The foam in the sole is engineered for the high-impact short-duration foot strike of running, not the low-impact long-duration foot strike of walking.

8) Focusing on duration

Sure, your friends only ask “how far did you go” and never “how many intervals did you crush.” But if you want to get fast you have to run faster. Period.

9) Buying unnecessary gear

Buy nice shoes. They protect your knees. Everything else is for looks and ego.

10) Taking advice from That Guy

Once word gets out that you are running you will be approached every runner, every has-been runner, every never-was runner, and everyone who even remotely knows one of the previously mentioned runners. And they will have unsolicited advice for you. Remember that genetics and everyone’s personal situation (i.e. body type, lifestyle, goals, etc) play a huge role in what makes them successful. The best hockey player I knew in high school used to blow coke pre-game. If I followed the logic of Blowing Coke = Better Skating I’d probably be dead. Sure, it’s a crazy example. But when the 3:20 marathoner in the cubicle next to you at work suggests pickle juice as a godsend for marathon hydration, don’t say I didn’t warn you.

 

Article contributed by Coach Scott Beesley.  He will neither confirm nor deny that he drank the pickle juice while training for his first race in 1999.  

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Triathlon Off Season Cross Training

Triathlon Off Season Cross Training

By Coach John Taipale

 

The most evil thing in endurance sports is getting stuck in a rut. Despite being divided amongst three sports, Triathlon can become monotonous. After working in a gym, it is apparent how many people are stuck in a rut. My prediction is 80% of the guests make no changes to their workout, have no change to their performance, and hope for better results. It’s insanity. The true definition of insanity is doing the same thing, yet seeking different results. That being said, we’re all probably guilty of this. We’re creatures of habit. We make systems and routines. It can be a good thing and a bad thing.

Considering I work with other, “creatures of habit,” I have built some non typical off season blocks of training for the last two years for a select few, willing clients (and myself). These training plans encompass very little Triathlon training and more Cross Country Skiing (Not limited to snowy areas via roller skiing), just as an experiment to break up the monotony. I am more than happy – even shocked – at the results, and it has left these athletes, mentally fresh through the Triathlon season. This is a new habit that’s not insane, it’s really good.

 

Let’s talk Exercise Physiology. Muscles adapt specifically to the movements they’re doing. This is not my opinion – This is a law. It is why some people may be stuck in a rut, why some don’t want to cross train, but it is only part of the equation. In doing cardiovascular training there are two adaptations, peripheral and central. Peripheral adaptations are things like mitochondria and capillaries within or around the working muscle. Central adaptations are things like heart rate and stroke volume (cardiac output). Peripheral adaptations (especially capillaries) take a long time to build. They also take a long time to go away. Central adaptations are very quick to adapt and very quick to go away. If you become a couch potato for one week, you’ll lose some mitochondria, a lot of cardiac output, but probably no capillary density will be lost. XC skiing will Increase central adaptations and maintain peripheral.

There is not a better sport for building cardiovascular fitness: XC skiers have the highest V02 max, they burn more Kcals/minute, and when they cross the finish line and collapse out of breath – it’s not for show. It’s a humbling sport, built on efficiency, and it maintains fitness like no other. With skiing, your cardiac output will go through the roof, (central adaptation) due to arms and legs both working. Despite a difference in specificity, you will retain some peripheral adaptations to bike, run, and swim muscles, but remember these adaptations last the longest without stimulus. For my guinea pig clients, results have shown that during power tests on the bike – during ski season – have not maintained, not a slight loss, but…wait for it… an increase in power. Power on the bike increased, while doing very little Triathlon training (I have not tested the other two sports). That’s pretty cool. I will say, however, this is after putting in some serious, well planned effort on the ski trails, as well as minimal, but smart Triathlon training. That’s not even the best part though; imagine yourself looking forward to more snow. The mental break is priceless.

 

Mental burnout is another evil thing that goes hand in hand with being stuck in a rut. Picture yourself waking up to a snowy morning; no chance of getting outside to bike or run. You’ve experienced snow for two months and snow for the next month is the likely forecast. You check the weather channel for the seventh time, just to make sure there was no sunshine. Nope. You must get on the trainer and then the treadmill – again. They stare at you like the bully who’s come to collect his lunch money. You think, “I can do this, one more month of winter,” but in reality, you know that’s not happening. You set up a nice YouTube video to watch while on the trainer. “The Ironman World Championship,” the perfect motivation for your upcoming Ironman. You have to get in a three hour bike ride – all the other Type A Triathletes are doing it. All of a sudden, the internet connection is lost… You curse the computer, then curse the internet, throw your bike shoes, storm out of the room. Your significant other is sound asleep – it’s 5am on a Saturday, “Wake up! What’s wrong with the internet!”

If this is you, you may need a cross training sport. I am representing XC skiing, as one of the best from a physiology standpoint. However, others would certainly do the job: Hockey, Basketball, Weight lifting, Yoga, Winter Mountain Biking could all give you a mental break. Even if they’re not physiologically perfect, they’re better than nothing. In some studies I’ve read, a 10 week training benefit was lost in 1 week. Ouch. Those who enjoy indoor training, hats off to you. But if you’re loosing interest in your sport, becoming irritable, not looking forward to the upcoming season, or even becoming burnt out in the middle of the summer, that’s not good. You may need a re-charge. Remember, this is supposed to be fun.

 

John Taipale is an amateur elite triathlete and coach based out of Hudson, Wisconsin.  He is currently pursuing a graduate degree in Clinical Exercise Physiology at University of Wisconsin at River Falls with a research focus on running economy.

 

 

 

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Foam Rolling

There are times when science leads to better training methods.  There are other times with science only comes in after the fact to validate what we are already doing.  In the case of foam rolling as a recovery tool for runners and triathletes, science has finally validated us.

 

 

 

The theory has always been massage of any kind breaks up the adhesion (read: knots) in our muscles and allows them to “grow” back in nice straight lines like muscle fibers should be.   As a result of this, muscle length increases and/or we have a greater range of motion (ROM).  Up until 2012 there was very little data either proving or disproving these claims.  Now we have some data.

foam roll

One study showed that ROM increased for up to 6 days post-self massage with a foam roller when combined with static stretching  (J Sport Rehab, Jan 2014).  This differs from most static stretching studies that generally did not result in any lasting ROM improvement.

The best piece of info to come from these studies is that there appears to be no change to muscle force production as a result of foam rolling and self-massage (Int J Sport Phys Training, June 2013; J St Con Res, Mar 2013).  This is great news.  For years those of us who felt better after stretch were forced to face the facts that stretching has the potential to decrease performance.  Foam rolling on the other hand, can be done prior to activity without the potential loss of perfromance.

And, finally, in the category of “Oh, Duh!” yet another study found that foam rolling leads to a decrease in pain at 24, 48, and 72 hours after activity (Med Sci Sport Ex, Jan 2014).  But you already knew that.

In summary, why foam roll?

  • Increased range of motion
  • No side effects
  • Feels good/decrease soreness

And when it doubt, if it feels good – do it.

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Body Recomposition for Runners

Don’t wait until the new year to start thinking about changing your body composition and making your race weight.  The time to lose fat, put on muscle or reshape your body in meaningful way is right now.

 

Since 1998 we have been helping all types of athletes reach their ideal weight and body composition.  And, no matter what the magazine cover at the supermarket tells you, the reality is that no one method works for all of us.  Why? We all have different diet restrictions, lifestyles, and vices.

 

peer reviewLike our training methodology, our body recomposition program is driven by evidence-based principles, while still adapting for the human element.  It is a system.  And it works.

 

This system will be presented at 6:00 pm on Thursday, November 20th at Trkac Running in Grass Valley.  Bring something to take notes and leave your checkbook at home.  This is an education seminar.  Not a sales pitch.

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